201118 Yang 099

Nebraska’s Jinliang Yang (pictured), assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture, and Gen Xu, post doc and first author of the study and their colleagues, have shown that differences in how genes are turned on and off, rather than actual changes in DNA, may explain some important physiological differences between modern-day maize and a 10,000-year-old ancestral species. November 18, 2020. Photo by Craig Chandler / University Communication.
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201118 Yang 099 (permalink)
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Nebraska’s Jinliang Yang (pictured), assistant professor of agronomy and horticulture, and Gen Xu, post doc and first author of the study and their colleagues, have shown that differences in how genes are turned on and off, rather than actual changes in DNA, may explain some important physiological differences between modern-day maize and a 10,000-year-old ancestral species. November 18, 2020. Photo by Craig Chandler / University Communication.